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Before you relocate

Relocating introduces a host of challenges, having the right insurance in place can make life abroad more comfortable

Last updated 6 May 2019

While there is a certain allure to travelling the world and experiencing new countries and cultures, many people forget is that there is a very big difference between being a tourist and an expat.

Being an expat often brings more legal requirements, paperwork, responsibilities and risk. However, the rewards are great, as long as the proper steps are taken beforehand.

One of those includes acquiring adequate international insurance coverage. A long-term stay and potential employment opportunities bring a host of challenges unlike those that domestic workers experience. Therefore, having the right protection in place can make life overseas more comfortable for you. 

In addition to international insurance, here are five things to consider before travelling or relocating abroad:

Do Research Ahead of Time

Kerry Hannon, a contributor to Forbes, wrote that doing a little homework before making the move abroad can be beneficial. She explained that there are many responsibilities as an expat, such as getting visas, setting up bank accounts, taxes and the language barrier. Figuring out which country works best for you can help you find a job, open a business, and live safely.

Go on a Vacation

Before becoming an expat, you may want to take an extended vacation as a tourist, Hannon noted. This step could be exactly what you need to figure out which country is the one you want to move to. Spending several months abroad will shed light on the pros and cons of a new nation, and it will allow you to really feel confident in buying a home and taking the plunge.

Embrace the Culture

In many countries, business etiquette is quite different than in the U.K. Your home country may be built upon quick meetings, rapid results and a demand for efficiency. However, that may not be the case abroad. Instead, take the time to learn the culture and embrace it. Doing so could help you find work and build a network overseas.

Know Your Rights

Rica Facundo, a contributor to Rappler, wrote that working abroad is often more complicated than the life of a tourist. It requires contracts, paperwork and permits. With that in mind, she recommended that you know your rights before moving overseas. For example, your stay could often be decided by the length of your employee contract. Once that expires, so too does your work permit. Then, you'll have to find another way to legally stay in the country.

Always Save Money

Facundo explained that working overseas requires a frugal mindset, even for younger adults. The job market in many countries could be volatile, which means it is smart to have a little extra cash nearby in case of emergency.

Experts for Expats has been featured in...

MailOnline - A third of British expats would like to move back to the UK and 40% admit they are homesick... but they will stay abroad for a better quality of life - click to see article
The Guardian - The older expats facing poverty – thanks to Brexit and frozen pensions - click to see article
BBC Breakfast - Expats in Cyprus having issues with UK bank accounts - click to see article
Saga - Want to retire in the EU? What could the future hold for you? - click to see article
The Observer - How to relocate overseas - click to see article
The Telegraph - The surprising places British expats can earn the most - click to see article

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